Pocket Watches

​​​A pocket watch (or pocketwatch) is a watch that is made to be carried in a pocket, as opposed to a wristwatch, which is strapped to the wrist. They were the most common type of watch from their development in the 16th century until wristwatches became popular after World War I during which a transitional design, trench watches were used by the military.

 

Pocket watches generally have an attached chain to allow them to be secured to a waistcoat, lapel, or belt loop, and to prevent them from being dropped. Watches were also mounted on a short leather strap or fob, when a long chain would have been cumbersome or likely to catch on things. This fob could also provide a protective flap over their face and crystal.

 

Women’s watches were normally of this form, with a fob that was more decorative than protective. Chains were frequently decorated with a silver or enamel pendant, often carrying the arms of some club or society, which by association also became known as a fob.

 

Ostensibly “practical” gadgets such as a watch winding key, vesta case or a cigar cutter also appeared on watch chains, although usually in an overly decorated style. Also common are fasteners designed to be put through a buttonhole and worn in a jacket or waistcoat, this sort being frequently associated with and named after train conductors.

 

There are three types of pocket watch

  • Open dial which has no cover over the dial

  • Half hunter case which has a front cover with a small hole in the centre of the cover which enables you to tell the time without opening the cover

  • Full hunter case which has a front cover

 

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"I must govern the clock, not be governed by it." - Golda Meir